Can you cite ethos and logos examples in Julius Caesar?

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In Act 2, Scene 2, Caesar, Calphurnia, and Decius are all debating over whether Caesar will appear at the Senate that day. Calphurnia wants him to remain at home and Decius tries to sway him to leave with him. There are several examples of logos and ethos in this scene.

CALPHURNIA

What mean you, Caesar? Think you to walk forth?
You shall not stir out of your house today.

CAESAR

Caesar shall forth. The things that threatened me
Ne'er looked but on my back. When they shall see
The face of Caesar, they are vanish├Ęd.

Caesar uses logos to try to calm his own fears and those of his wife. In effect, he is saying that nothing has killed him thus far in life, so it stands to reason that he is mighty enough to overcome any further trouble which may find him.

CAESAR

What can be avoided
Whose end is purposed by the mighty gods?
Yet Caesar shall go forth.

This is another example of logos. Caesar explains that ultimately his fate is out of his hands and rests with the gods. He should go to the Senate because if...

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