Can U think of another character that is like Nora?I love Doll's House so much, and I always love reading stories such as these, where a woman goes through a process of self-evaluation, and...

Can U think of another character that is like Nora?

I love Doll's House so much, and I always love reading stories such as these, where a woman goes through a process of self-evaluation, and realizes the oppresions of society upon her without excessive drama, nor throwing a hissy-fit.

Which novels/stories would present a similar situation, or a similar character?

Asked on by M.P. Ossa

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drmonica | (Level 2) Associate Educator

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The Age of Innocence is one example. Ellen Olenska is someone who lives life on her own terms. May Welland eventually learns how to gain some control, although she operates within the bounds of polite society.

The House of Mirth is another. Lily ultimately ends up committing suicide, but along the journey she becomes completely aware of the suffocating restrictiveness of society on females without access to their own money.

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alisonjeaninelewis | Student, Undergraduate | eNotes Newbie

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Nora is the exact same character as Daisy in The Great Gatsby. Throughout the play, Nora appears to be naive to everyone; however, her individuality often peaks through, like in the first scene in Act I, Nora knows exactly how to play Torvald in order to get money from him. Also, Nora is constantly trying to convince Kristine and Dr. Rank that she is more than a privileged puppet. Yet, when anything serious comes up in her life, Nora shies away and crawls back into her childish shell. This is much similar to Daisy who acknowledges that the only way to get anywhere in life is to act as a naive little fool. She, too, crawls under a rock when Daisy runs over Mrs. Wilson but allows Gatsby to tae the blame which ultimately leads to his death. The biggest difference between these two characters is that Nora is able to breach the surface and find individuality. Daisy, on the other hand, is more willing to live in a perfect bubble and allow her husband to treat her however he pleases as long as her fairytale is not shattered.

I feel she resembled Daisy very heavily, but also shows her differences. Daisy throughout The Great Gatsby acts that she has character identity, and she acknowledges that she is in fact her own person. Nora never truly reveals herself, except for the identity that she is childish and knows nothing else but to be ignorant and overjoyed by life, as everything is blissful all the time. Daisy acts like life is pure bliss, but in the end, she realizes that in order to have real happiness, she has to be brave. Nora figures this out too, but she never truly is going to "get her feet wet" in the duration of the play. She never truly shows how she's in the pursuit of real happiness, instead of forged happiness like she portrays to know all along, and that is how they differ immensely.

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kaitlin44 | Student, Undergraduate | eNotes Newbie

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Nora is the exact same character as Daisy in The Great Gatsby. Throughout the play, Nora appears to be naive to everyone; however, her individuality often peaks through, like in the first scene in Act I, Nora knows exactly how to play Torvald in order to get money from him. Also, Nora is constantly trying to convince Kristine and Dr. Rank that she is more than a privileged puppet. Yet, when anything serious comes up in her life, Nora shies away and crawls back into her childish shell. This is much similar to Daisy who acknowledges that the only way to get anywhere in life is to act as a naive little fool. She, too, crawls under a rock when Daisy runs over Mrs. Wilson but allows Gatsby to tae the blame which ultimately leads to his death. The biggest difference between these two characters is that Nora is able to breach the surface and find individuality. Daisy, on the other hand, is more willing to live in a perfect bubble and allow her husband to treat her however he pleases as long as her fairytale is not shattered.

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carric | Student, Undergraduate | eNotes Newbie

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Reading The Age of Innocence by Edith Wharton, I was struck by the similarities between Ellen and Nora, though their situations are completely different. Though Nora's husband is doting and adoring rather than harsh like Ellen's, both women strive to break the traditions of turn-of-the-century society to become indiviuduals and lead meaningful lives.

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alexandertom05 | Student, Undergraduate | eNotes Newbie

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Oddly enough, I feel that Nora reflects Fitzgerald's, The Great Gatsby's Daisy.  Both women are, later, empowered by preceding events and, prior, exude "the persona."  Not to stray too much off topic, but paying attention to Ibsen's A Doll's House with a Jungian Theory lens, provides tangible evidence of the persona: Nora.  Throughout Act I and parts of Act II, Nora is a trophy wife - a display model not to be heard, touched, or understand.  Likewise, Daisy is placed in a glass case for all to see.  Both women share what Carl Jung calls the persona archetype.

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myrapixler | Student, Undergraduate | eNotes Newbie

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I agree with the person who said Pride and Prejudice because Elizabeth Bennett is a lot like Nora. She lives in a controlled environment where her mother pushes her thoughts and opinions on all five of her daughters. However, Elizabeth has her own independent opinions and stands up for herself like Nora does at the end. When Mr. Collins proposes to Elizabeth, she refuses because despite the pleading of her desperate mother who wishes to marry off all of her daughters as soon as possible, Elizabeth knows she can do better. She has enough confidence in herself to know that she can find a better husband for herself which she does.

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frannycap | Student, Undergraduate | eNotes Newbie

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In Mark Mathabane’s Kaffir Boy, the main character's mother is in a very oppressive environment. In South Africa, during the apartheid regime, she is subject to a far more personally abusive authority in addition to the prejudice in her country. She lives with a man who has lived under tribal laws his whole life, a lifestyle where the man of the house's word is law. Throughout the story, she is abused emotionally and physically as she struggles to provide a better life for her children, an institution her husband is firmly against. Eventually, she develops more confidence and starts acting on her own. She succeeds in her goal and finds her own power as well.

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obrunacini | Student, Undergraduate | eNotes Newbie

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A female character who shares a few similarities with Nora is Tita from Laura Esquivel's novel, Like Water For Chocolate. Tita, like Nora, is unhappy with the lack of freedom and independence she has. Tita is held back by Mama Elena and must lie and fake about her happiness to avoid being scolded by Elena. Elena held Tita back from her true love, Pedro, until Tita finally had the courage to be open about her love with Pedro and not John (Tita's other love interest).

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jcelniker13 | Student, Undergraduate | eNotes Newbie

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From Hemingway's masterpiece on the expatriate life in post-WWI Europe, The Sun Also Rises, Lady Brett Ashley relates to Nora on numerous levels.  Like Nora, Brett also indulges in her society's perks as the story begins to take shape; however, by the end of the novel, she curses her culture for taking away another love from her.  Both Nora and Brett's encounters with the negative realities of society could be avoided if they had chose more prudent measures in the past, but that does not negate the fact that neither character could stop the chain of societal and personal reactions once the initial motions were set in place.  These two women seek individuality and freedom, and both are symbols of feminine strength in conservative societies that are destined for revolution.

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beeabarton | Student, Undergraduate | eNotes Newbie

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Another character similar to Nora in some regards is Anna Karenina (title character for Tolstoy's Anna Karenina) in that she goes against oppressive "norms" placed on her by society.  She chooses to leave her husband, Alexei Karenin, whom she doesn't really love, in order to live in adultery with Vronsky, her true love.  Unlike Nora, however, this change isn't liberating for her, and it eventually drives her to suicide.

The two authors use a similar female main character and sequence of events to suggest opposite themes about life.  Tolstoy suggests that domestic life is the root of happiness, while Ibsen suggests rather that independent thought is the cause of happiness, not specifically family life or independence from such life.

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alexlstein3 | Student, Undergraduate | eNotes Newbie

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The solitary character that comes to mind when I think of Nora is Mariam in A Thousand Splendid Suns.  Mariam makes the transformation from immature child to a functioning adult, just like Nora.

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madelinecelley | Student, Undergraduate | eNotes Newbie

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Catherine Linton from Wuthering Heights is similar to Nora. She was forced into an unhappy marriage with a controlling husband (Linton).  Eventually, she had the courage to stand up to her oppressor, Heathcliff, and married her love, Hareton.

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epollock | (Level 3) Valedictorian

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How about Pride and Prejudice where Elizabeth refuses to live life except on her own terms. She might be opinionated, but it fits within a delightful characterization.

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