Where are examples of reverse, thrust, normal, and strike-slip faults on our planet?

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jgeertz | College Teacher | (Level 1) Associate Educator

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A fault is a crack, or fracture, in the Earth's crust where movement has occurred. Faults are classified according to how the rocks on each side of the fault move past each other.

Strike-slip faults occur when rocks move past each other horizontally. The San Andreas Fault in California is an example.

Dip-slip faults occur when rocks move parallel to the dip in the fault. Owens Valley in California is an example.

Reverse faults are a type of dip-slip fault that result from compression or pushing together of rocks. The Sierra Madre in southern California is an example.

Thrust faults are a type of reverse fault characterized by a gentle dip. The Klamath Mountains in northern California and the Pennsylvania Crab Orchard Mountain Group in Tennessee are examples.

Normal faults are a type of dip-slip fault that result from extension or pulling apart of rocks. The Cambrian Kinsers Formation in the Thomasville Quarry in Pennsylvania is an example.

 

 

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