In A Doll's House, what crime has Nora committed?

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Prior to the beginning of the plot of A Doll's House, Nora committed forgery. A desperate woman and devoted wife, she grasped for a way to pay for her husband's needed medical treatment. She turned to Krogstad, who realizes that the signature is dated three days after her father died (quite the slip on Nora's part) and that Nora replicated his signature as well. Unfortunately, Krogstad isn't a compassionate guy and uses this knowledge to blackmail Nora, telling her that "if I get shoved down a second time, you're going to keep me company" (act 1).

Under current laws in the United States, forgery is potentially punishable under federal penalties. Forgery is determined to have taken place if the signature is false (which Nora's is), if the false signature has a legal significance (which a loan would carry), and if there is an intent to defraud (and Nora intended to deceive Krogstad). While the play is written in a different historical context, Nora would have nevertheless faced penalties for...

(The entire section contains 4 answers and 907 words.)

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Last Updated by eNotes Editorial on January 15, 2020
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