Can someone tell me how they think Stevie Wonder talks about love/relationships in his song "Overjoyed"?

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ophelious | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator

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"Overjoyed" by Stevie Wonder is fairly simple in its emotional message.  The protagonist of the song is in love with someone and has been for some time, but that person does not feel the same.  It's kind of a depressing song that is meant to be hopeful.

The man in the song obviously spent a long time in "secret love" before revealing his interest (which apparently has not been well received) because he says:

"...you never knew it was of you I've been dreaming"

In sort of an obsessive stroke, the narrator lets it be known that there's no turning back for him:

"I've gone much too far, for you now to say
That I've got to throw my castle away"

Despite the rejection, he still hopes that with time she:

"might be overjoyed, over loved, over me"

To me, the whole thing seems a bit stalker-ish, though I don't think it's meant to be.  I suppose it's in how you look at it, but lines like this don't help:

"I've come much too far for me now to find
The love that I've sought can never be mine"

She's already rejected him, so you're left to wonder what his next move will be.  That's where I get the creepy vibe.  The rest of the song pretty much just restates the theme: I've loved you for a long time and prepared to build a life with you, but when I told you that you turned me down.  I don't care though, because if I just keep at it I'm hoping you'll change your mind.

This was a pretty big hit for Wonder in the 80's.  It's a romantic version of love, if you see it that way, and I suppose it's up to the listener to decide if he/she thinks the woman will change her mind.  Personally, I think she'll go the route of the restraining order.  The narrator is too focused on his own feelings and desires and gives little mention to her...she is just a faceless, nameless, "concept" of a woman.

 

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