Can someone provide a quote from Oliver Twist that shows how Monk is cruel other than this quote? "While Monks was pacing up and down, meditating with dark and evil" I need a quote that show how...

Can someone provide a quote from Oliver Twist that shows how Monk is cruel other than this quote?

"While Monks was pacing up and down, meditating with dark and evil"

I need a quote that show how the Monk is cruel, preferably through his actions towards Oliver.

Asked on by yoonoo1010

1 Answer | Add Yours

litteacher8's profile pic

litteacher8 | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

Monks is cruel because he wants Oliver ruined, and tries to get Fagin to do it.

Monks is the only one who knows Oliver’s true identity, and instead of helping Oliver he makes sure to hand him over to a fence and a criminal.  This is a demonstration of Monks’s cruelty.    He wants to destroy his own step-brother, out of jealousy and to make sure that he never inherits anything.

Monks insists on knowing why Fagin hasn’t turned Oliver into a criminal.

'Haven't you done it, with other boys, scores of times? If you had had patience for a twelvemonth, at most, couldn't you have got him convicted, and sent safely out of the kingdom; perhaps for life?' (Ch. 26)

He goes on to tell Fagin to do anything he wants to Oliver, as long as he doesn’t kill him, because that “haunts a man.”  He just wants Oliver’s reputation destroyed.  He knows that Oliver has done nothing wrong, and is currently innocent and pure.  He wants Fagin to eliminate that pureness as quickly as possible, and is impatient that he isn’t doing it.

Monks is a cringing, whining, cruel and horrible step-brother.  He never looks out for Oliver as a brother should, and instead he throws him to the wolves.  The visit to Fagin he makes in this chapter demonstrates it, as do his later actions when he attempts to ensure that Oliver’s true identity is not revealed to Brownlow. 

Oliver Twist is a progress, which means that Oliver goes through the story without much development. He does not change, as much characters do.  He remains pure and good.  Other characters do things to him, and make decisions for him, and things happen to him, rather than him growing and changing and making choices.  Monks’s attempts to corrupt Oliver are an example of this.

A bargain was struck with Fagin, that if Oliver was got back he should have a certain sum; and he was to have more for making him a thief, which this Monks wanted for some purpose of his own.' (Ch. 40)

Of course, Oliver manages to evade Fagin's grasp.  He is good, and he does not change.  He escapes, even though he is framed for theft.  When he is recaptured by Fagin and taken by Sikes to rob Brownlow, he is victimized yet again.  Yet throughout it all, Oliver remains good.  He eventually comes to find a true home with Brownlow, and he is in the right place.

Sources:

We’ve answered 318,955 questions. We can answer yours, too.

Ask a question