Can someone prove that there is a relationship between the structure (language, meter etc.. ) and the content of the following poem? Many thanks!Here is the poem : Emily Dickinson: "It dropped so...

Can someone prove that there is a relationship between the structure (language, meter etc.. ) and the content of the following poem? Many thanks!

Here is the poem :

Emily Dickinson: "It dropped so low - in my Regard"

It dropped so low in my regard
I heard it hit the ground,
And go to pieces on the stones
At bottom of my mind;

Yet blamed the fate that fractured, less
Than I reviled myself
For entertaining plated wares
Upon my silver shelf.

Asked on by mercure

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booboosmoosh's profile pic

booboosmoosh | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

In Emily Dickinson's "It dropped so low—in my Regard," I can see that there is a relationship between the language and the meter chosen, and the poem's structure.

The meter of the poem is also seen in other poems by this author: there are two stanzas in this piece, and the pattern of rhythm each stanza follows is eight beats in the first and third lines, and six beats in the second and fourth. The beat settles on everything other syllable, starting with the second syllable of each line, so there are four accented syllables in the first and third lines, and three accented syllables in the second and fourth lines.

Since the poem speaks of something dropping, I would consider that perhaps the meter mimics the sound of something falling. It does not refer to multiple things dropping, so my sense is that the repeated "thudding" might speak to the depth to which this "something" has plummeted in the speaker's regard.

The idea of the "dropping" is also "heard" in the language Dickinson chooses, such as:  hit, pieces, fractured, and plated wares. In terms of language, imagery here is also important to the sense of something dropping: "I heard it hit the ground, / And go to pieces on the stones..."

The structure of the poem is found in devices such as meter and language, which support the message Emily Dickinson is attempting, beautifully, to convey to the reader: someone has fallen off of the speaker's pedestal, falling in her regard or esteem.

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