Please explain the poem "The Eagle" by Alfred Lord Tennyson.

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Alfred, Lord Tennyson, wrote "The Eagle" in 1851, a Romantic poem, though a late one in terms of the Romantic movement in Britain. Romantic poets often imbued their poems with a reverence for nature, and this poem was inspired by a sight Tennyson encountered on one of his many walks.

In two rhymed tercets (three-line stanzas), Tennyson captures the image of a lone eagle perched on high, surveying the world beneath him. The landscape is described in Romantic terms using "azure" to describe the sky and "wrinkled" to describe the texture of the sea. Tennyson's speaker observes sky, mountains, and sea, three vast and majestic elements of the natural world.

In the final line, the speaker observes the eagle's dive with a simile: "like a thunderbolt he falls." Thunderbolts are associated with God or the gods, and here, Tennyson's diction elevates the eagle to their powerful realm.

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This imagery poem by Alfred Lord Tennyson originates from his experiences while traveling as a young man in the...

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