Can someone make a working bibliography for a Cinderella essay with at least 10 academic/scholarly sources?

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A working bibliography for Cinderella will include sources that you can use as you write about the fairy tale. The focus of your essay will determine which sources are the most useful. It's important to remember that working bibliographies aren't final versions; they're intended to change as you narrow your...

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A working bibliography for Cinderella will include sources that you can use as you write about the fairy tale. The focus of your essay will determine which sources are the most useful. It's important to remember that working bibliographies aren't final versions; they're intended to change as you narrow your search and decide which sources are best for you to use.

  • Alcantud-Diaz, M. (2012). “The sisters did her every imaginable injury”: power and violence in Cinderella. International Journal of English Studies, (2), 59.

This article is an analysis of the language in Cinderella and how it shows violence. The author says violence in a text needs to be considered from a publishing standpoint when creating literature for children.

  • Bettelheim, B. (1975). The uses of enchantment: the meaning and importance of fairy tales. New York, NY: Random House.

This book looks at child development through fairy tales and shows how people can use them to better understand things and face fears. The chapter on Cinderella includes the interesting tidbit that "long before Perrault gave 'Cinderella' the form in which it is now widely known, 'having to live among the ashes' was a symbol of being debased in comparison to one's siblings, irrespective of sex" (236).

  • Blankier, M. (2014). Adapting and transforming "Cinderella": fairy-tale adaptations and the limits of existing adaptation theory. Interdisciplinary Humanities, 31(3), 108–123.

This article uses Cinderella as an example to discuss how fairy tales can be adapted across different mediums and cultures. It also discusses the problems with adaptation and adaptation theory.

  • DeGraff, A. (1996). From glass slipper to glass ceiling: "Cinderella" and the endurance of a fairy tale. Merveilles & Contes, 10(1), 69-85. Retrieved from http://www.jstor.org/stable/41390220

This article discusses the adaptability of Cinderella and talks about the differences between text and video versions.

  • Dundes, A. (1982). Cinderella, a casebook. Madison, Wisconsin: The University of Wisconsin Press.

This book contains a variety of essays on Cinderella. The author says they're intended to be a representative sample of over 100 years of work.

  • Fohr, S.D. (1991). Cinderella's gold slipper: spiritual symbolism in the Grimms' tales. Wheaton, IL: Sophia Perennis.

This book examines various fairy tales, including Cinderella. It talks about two major types of Cinderella stories and the symbolism behind the character archetypes.

  • Lieberman, M. (1972). "Some day my prince will come": female acculturation through the fairy tale. College English, 34(3), 383-395. doi:10.2307/375142

This essay discusses how reading fairy tales can guide girls into believing harmful stereotypes or prepare them to take traditional roles in society.

  • Panttaja, E. (1993). Going up in the world: class in "Cinderella". Western Folklore, 52(1), 85-104. doi:10.2307/1499495

This article is a liberal cultural analysis of class in Cinderella. The author says that earlier studies skewed conservative and made assumptions about fairy tales that need to be challenged.

  • Preston, C. (1994). "Cinderella" as a dirty joke: gender, multivocality, and the polysemic text. Western Folklore, 53(1), 27-49. doi:10.2307/1499651

This article examines a joke in a version of the story and explains how it relates to views of gender, class, and representation from the dominant culture.

  • Williams, C. (2010). The shoe still fits: Ever After and the pursuit of a feminist Cinderella. In Zipes J. (Author) & Greenhill P. & Matrix S. (Eds.), Fairy Tale Films: Visions of Ambiguity (pp. 99-115). University Press of Colorado. doi:10.2307/j.ctt4cgn37.10

This version explains that while the Cinderella character Danielle does break tradition, she isn't a fully realized feminist character. She still ends up in a traditional role and no one in the movie questions traditional gender roles.

Using keywords can help you find more journal articles and books to expand your search as you continue to increase the entries in your bibliography. While these examples are given in APA format, other formats like MLA may be required depending on what type of bibliography you're developing.

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