Can someone explain Newton's second law In an understandable way for a year 10 student

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jeew-m | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

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Newton's second law of motion

  • The rate at which momentum change in an object is equal to the net force acting on the object.

Net force acting on object = Rate of momentum change in object

So momentum = mass*velocity

Usually when changing momentum velocity is the most common changing factor since mass is constant most of the times. So then;

Rate of change in momentum = rate of change in velocity

 

Imagine a situation a ball is rolling on a ground. Lets take it's mass as m and velocity as v1. Then we apply a force on the ball for time of t which result in a velocity change to v2.

So initial momentum of the ball = m*v1

      Final momentum of the ball = m*v2

 

From the Newtons second law,

Force acting on ball = rate of momentum change

                            = (final momentum-initial momentum)/time

                            = (m*v2-m*v1)/t

                            = m(v2-v1)/t

                            = m*[(v2-v1)/t]

                            = m*a

Where a is accelaration.

Here (v2-v1)/t = rate of change in velocity = accelaration.

 

So simply speaking we can say that the Newton's second law of motion reveals that force acing on a object is equal to the product of its mass and the accelation due to the force.

 

Note:

The momentum change can be occured even by change in mass.But it is too complex at this grade.

 

 

 

 

Sources:

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