Can I have a detailed analysis of the poem ''Verses Wrote On Her Death-Bed, To Her Husband In London'' by Mary Monck? Please comment a bit on the language, structure, tone, theme, and imagery. 

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In terms of structure, this poem is one long stanza.  It is written in the AABBCC (and so on) rhyme scheme.  That means each consecutive pair of lines rhymes with each other.  In poetry language, that's called a couplet.  

Thou, who dost all my worldly thoughts employ, Thou...

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In terms of structure, this poem is one long stanza.  It is written in the AABBCC (and so on) rhyme scheme.  That means each consecutive pair of lines rhymes with each other.  In poetry language, that's called a couplet.  

Thou, who dost all my worldly thoughts employ,
Thou pleasing source of all my earthly joy:

Regarding the poem's rhythm and meter, the poem is written in iambic pentameter.  That means each line contains 10 syllables.  Those syllables are a repeated pattern of stressed and unstressed.  An unstressed syllable followed by a stressed syllable is the iambic foot.  Because each line has 10 syllables, each line has exactly 5 iambic feet; therefore, the poem is written in iambic pentameter.  I can show the stressed and unstressed rhythm by using bold for the stressed syllables within a line from the poem. 

To thee / this first, / this last / adieu/ I send

In terms of tone, the poem's narrator conveys a tone of calm, peaceful acceptance.  She knows that she is dying, and she is not afraid.  If anything, she is glad about it because it will bring an end to her pain. Line 9 is a good example of this: 

He [death] promises a lasting rest from pain;

The line continues the personification of death from a few lines earlier, and the line definitely conveys the narrator's calm and accepting tone toward her future death.  The final two lines of the poem further convey her positive tone as she encourages her husband to be happy for her as well: 

Rather rejoice to see me shake off life, 
And die as I have liv'd, thy faithful wife. 

Thematically, there is a theme about death.  The interesting twist is that death is not shown as a bad or evil thing.  In this case, death is a rescuer to people that have lived in pain for many years.  A second theme is marriage and faithfulness.  The final lines of the poem really drive home the fact that the narrator loves her husband.  She wants him to be happy, and she wants him to know that she always loved him enough to be forever faithful to him. 

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