Can behavioral and attitudinal variables be used to group consumers according to needs or responses that differ by benefits expected, usage occasion, user and loyalty status, techno-logical...

Can behavioral and attitudinal variables be used to group consumers according to needs or responses that differ by benefits expected, usage occasion, user and loyalty status, techno-logical orientation, attitudes and price sensitivity?

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mwestwood | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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There are many, many marketing campaigns that consider behavioral and attitudinal variables to categorize consumers according to differing needs, expectations of benefits, usage, techno-logical orientation, attitudes, price sensitivity, and loyalty. Then the information gleaned on these variables is utilized in distributing consumable products. For instance, products as simple and small as cigarettes are distributed differently in different socio-economic areas as sales statistics prove. Likewise, beer and liquor sales differ where there are different demographics because socio-economic and certain ethnic groups have tastes from certain types of beer and/or brands. For example, malt beers are popular with some ethnic groups, but not others.

Certainly, the car industry considers many behavioral and attitudinal variables, designing different models of vehicles that will appeal to the various consumer categories. Sports cars, for instance, are equipped with attractive and state-of-the-art devices and capacities in the interiors, while the exterior is made to entice young men, especially, as they are, perhaps, the largest group who purchases them. SUVs are made to appeal to mothers with 2+ children, perhaps, and have easily accessible compartments, etc. One new selling point for the Honda van is a built in vacuum that can easily be pulled out for clean-ups after the little members of the family have been in the back seats. Sales discounts may be given to returning customers, etc.

Studying the purchasing patterns, desires, and needs of potential customers is as old as advertising and sales; considering behavioral and attitudinal variables is just essential marketing. Regis McKenna has written a book entitle, Relationship Marketing in which he proposes that with the advancement of technology and sophistication of the modern consumer demand much dialogue that includes all of the components listed above as well as suppliers, distributors, and even competitors along with, of course, the consumers.

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