Can anyone suggest any teenage/young adult fantasy/adventure fiction novels? I've just finished the Chaos Walking series by Patrick Ness and I loved it, so anything on par or higher please, and that kind of genre. I'm not going anywhere near harry potter or lord of the rings, something a bit more obscure please.

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The Lightening Thief by Rick Riordan is a very entertaining and enlightening mid-grade fantasy novel. It is about a group of young demigods on a quest. Children of the Lamp by P.B. Kerr is also very good. My favorite mid-grade fantasy/adventure novel is The Mysterious Benedict Society, by Trenton Lee Stewart. 

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Alright, I admit that my suggestion does not fulfil your "obscurity" requirement, but The Hunger Games (Suzanne Collins) series completely lived up to the hype for me, which is rare.

I second the recommendation for Ender's Game, which also turned into two series (in two different directions, one which follows the original characters, the other which takes a much more science fiction turn).

I might also recommend Dune (Frank Herbert), which is lengthy in itself and certainly fits the "on par or higher" difficulty level.

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Would you consider Star Wars books? There are quite a few novels based on the Star Wars world and characters that take place in the time frame between episodes 6 and 7 of the trilogy time-line (I know there is no episode seven...yet, but George Lucas wrote/outlined nine episodes of his saga and asked writers to fill in the twenty year time gap between episodes 6 and 7.). 

Some of these books are very good and they all qualify as entertaining.

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I suggest The Lord of the Rings.  Although it is published as a trilogy, it is actually just one long book.  You have to read it several times to appreciate it (or watch the movie), but it is worth it because the world created is so detailed and the characters are so interesting.

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Orson Scott Card novels fit the bill, especially Ender's Game.  It is the kind of science fiction/fantasy that transcends mere technological speculation and deals with real issues of 21st century violence.  Another goldmine are the science fiction/fantasy novels of the 1950's and 60's--Isaac Asimov and his contemporaries.  The Big Eye (Max Ehrlich) is another.  For fantasy, rather than science fiction, try Chronicles of Narnia (C.S. Lewis).  The main problem is that you are almost too old for "fantasy" itself, which requires a kind of juvenile naivete, an innocence of imagation.  You should probably begin your journey into "adult" novels, especially 19th-century European novels by Balsac or the Bronte sisters, because their idea of fantasy is an ideal world before the modern era, when one's identity in society was fantasized for the reader. 

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