Can anyone please describe the speaker's chamber?What did it look like, how did it feel, what kind of vibe the room gave off, etc.(overall the setting of the room) Any direct quotes from the...

Can anyone please describe the speaker's chamber?

What did it look like, how did it feel, what kind of vibe the room gave off, etc.(overall the setting of the room) Any direct quotes from the reading will be appreciated! (:

Expert Answers
mwestwood eNotes educator| Certified Educator

In Edgar Allan Poe's "The Raven," little is revealed about the chamber at whose door the ominous raven appears and quotes "Nevermore!"  In the second stanza a fire has been lit in the fireplace, and it casts an eerie glow.  In order to set the mood, Poe states that he seeks "surcease of sorrow" from his books, so there is probably a bookcase or shelves for books. 

In the seventh stanza the bird continues to rap, and the speaker flings open his door only for the raven to fly into the room and perch upon "a bust of Pallas just above my chamber door."  This detail suggests that the room is decorated in a classic style since Pallas Athena is the Greek god of wisdom.  In the twelfth stanza, Poe decides to sit down and watch, beguiled.  He wheels a "cushioned seat," perhaps in the Victorian style, suggesting that he has a comfortable chair that can be wheeled.  Into this chair. he sinks and leans his head against the backing.  On this luxurious velvet lining  of the chair, the lamplight seems to gloat over!

The tone is ominous as the large raven casts foreboding shadows from atop the bust of Pallas.  The books sit silently, some with pages open as the speaker's activities have been broken off.  The dark violet cushions bespeak gloom, as well, in a room that should have been comfortable.