Paraphrase "Out, Out" by Robert Frost.

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Most people that have read Robert Frost's poetry are likely surprised at "Out, Out." First of all, it does not contain Frost's typical multi-stanza format with easily identifiable rhythm, meter, and rhyme. Perhaps equally surprising is that "Out, Out" is a deeply sad poem.

The poem begins by telling readers about a saw that is being used to cut sticks of wood short enough to be used in the stove. It is a beautifully painted scene that calls special attention to the smell of the freshly cut wood and the grandeur of the sunset and mountains. The saw's noise changes pitches as it struggles with various sizes of sticks, and readers are specifically told that the day was nearly done and "nothing happened," which suggests that everything was going as it should.

Unfortunately, tragedy hits. The boy who is cutting wood is called inside to dinner, and that is the moment the saw "leaped" and cut the boy's hand. The boy is shocked at what has happened and knows enough to elevate the wound to slow down...

(The entire section contains 2 answers and 835 words.)

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