can anyone give some examples of excersis of objet pronouns and with subject too?  its for a 4th year high  school? Can anyone give some examples of exercises with object pronouns and with...

can anyone give some examples of excersis of objet pronouns and with subject too?  its for a 4th year high  school? 

Can anyone give some examples of exercises with object pronouns and with subjects, too?  This is for a 4th year high  school?

Asked on by pepperment

4 Answers | Add Yours

ask996's profile pic

ask996 | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Senior Educator

Posted on

I would suggest looking into the grammar resource I use. It should help review, reinforce, and teach the grammar skills anyone needs to address. I use a text called Daily Grammar Practice. This uses the same sentence every day for a week. Monday addresses the parts of speech for the sentence. Tuesday addresses the sentence parts. Wednesday addresses the clause(s) and sentence types. Thursday addresses capitalization. Friday addresses diagramming. Other mini-lessons are embedded in the sentence, and this arrangement is wonderful because each day builds on and reinforces the learning from the previous days.

mwestwood's profile pic

mwestwood | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

The above exercises have provided you with personal pronouns as subjects and objects.  However, there also can be other types of pronouns used as subjects.  For instance, demonstrative pronouns, such as this, that, these and those.  But, since they do not change their spellings in the nominative or objective case, you may not need them.  Nevertheless, here is a quick example: 

This is the very spot that we camped on our trip last year.  [subject]

Please hand me that. [object]  (me is the indirect object)

-----Like the personal pronouns, however, who, whom, whose are relative pronouns that do have case.  Here are examples of their usage as subjects and objects:

In interrrogative sentences:

Who is your favorite singer? [subject] 

Whom do you want?  [object]

In relative clauses:

Here is the girl whom you already have met. [object of the clause]

Henry is the boy who you want to fix your car. [subject of the clause]

-----In noun clauses, whoever and whomever are used as subjects and objects respectively:

Whoever wishes to join us is welcome. [subject]

Whomever you choose as a partner must wear this costume. [object]

auntlori's profile pic

Lori Steinbach | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

These sentences are absolutely full of pronouns so you can get a little practice; in reality, we rarely use so many pronouns in any one sentence because it's just too confusing. 

She and I will be attending the party with her and them.

She, I = subjects, so nominative case

Her, them = objects of the preposition, so objective case

We voted them into office.

We = subject, so nominative case

them = direct object, so nominative case

I am she.

I = subject, so nominative case

she = predicate nominative, so nominative case

Thank you for being willing to study this grammar issue.  Hope this helps!

 

lmetcalf's profile pic

lmetcalf | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Senior Educator

Posted on

Here are a few an example sentences:

He and I are going with him and her to the mall.

He and I are subject case/nominative case pronouns and are the subject(s) of the sentence.  Him and her are object case pronouns and I need to use objective case here because him and her are the object of the preposition "with."

They saw her at the movies.

They is a subject case pronoun and the subject of the sentence.  Her is in the objective case because "her" is the direct object of the verb saw.

They and we all bought  them new toys.

They are we are subject case pronouns and are the subject(s) of the sentence.  "them" is in the objective case because it is the indirect object of toys.  (It is the person receiving the direct object.)

We’ve answered 318,991 questions. We can answer yours, too.

Ask a question