Please find quotes about Curley and Curley's wife in Of Mice and Men.

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Much about the character of Curley and his wife is learned in the second chapter as George and Lennie adjust to their new surroundings and the people who live on the ranch.

Candy makes this assessment of Curley:

Well . . . tell you what. Curley's like a lot of...

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Much about the character of Curley and his wife is learned in the second chapter as George and Lennie adjust to their new surroundings and the people who live on the ranch.

Candy makes this assessment of Curley:

Well . . . tell you what. Curley's like a lot of little guys. He hates big guys. He's alla time picking scraps with big guys. Kind of like he's mad at 'em because he ain't a big guy. You seen little guys like that, ain't you? Always scrappy?

Curley is therefore depicted as a small guy with something to prove. He walks around looking for ways to exert his masculinity, and Lennie proves a likely target for his constant anger.

It's also clear that his new wife isn't helping the situation:

He got married a couple of weeks ago. Wife lives over in the boss’s house. Seems like Curley is cockier’n ever since he got married.

This establishes some early conflict between Curley and his wife; a newlywed man should be floating through life on the happiness of early marital bliss. The fact that his angst has grown in the short period of time since his wedding signals trouble.

When Curley's wife appears looking for him, she isn't exactly dressed for life on a ranch:

A girl was standing there looking in. She had full, rouged lips and widespaced eyes, heavily made up. Her fingernails were red. Her hair hung in little rolled clusters, like sausages. She wore a cotton house dress and red mules, on the insteps of which were little bouquets of red ostrich feathers.

This ostentatious display of color and materials suggests that Curley's wife needs the constant attention of men, and that supports the comments made about her earlier:

I seen her give Slim the eye... I seen her give Slim the eye. Curley never seen it. An’ I seen her give Carlson the eye.

Curley's wife is depicted as an untrustworthy woman, and a particularly unsuitable wife for ranch life. In chapter 4, she comments to some of the ranch workers,

What am I doin'? Standin' here talkin' to a bunch of bindle stiffs—a nigger an' a dum-dum and a lousy ol' sheep—an' likin' it because they ain't nobody else.

The combination of her unsatisfied and wandering eye and Curley's tumultuous disposition establishes a seemingly dangerous combination—a tornado of conflict begins to stir on the horizon.

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Curley is the boss's son and is depicted as an aggressive, pugnacious individual, who instantly dislikes George and Lennie when they arrive to work on the farm. Before George and Lennie meet Curley, Candy warns them about him and offers an accurate description of Curley by saying,

Curley's pretty handy. He done quite a bit in the ring. He's a lightweight, and he's handy. (13)

Candy's comment reveals that Curley is a hostile, threatening individual who is confident in his abilities as a fighter. Candy goes on to tell George,

Curley's like a lot of little guys. He hates big guys. He's alla time picking scraps with big guys. Kind of like he's mad at 'em because he ain't a big guy. You seen little guys like that, ain't you? Always scrappy? (13)

Candy's description foreshadows Curley's altercation with Lennie later in the story. Curley starts a fight with Lennie but Lennie ends up severely breaking his hand during the altercation. Candy also says,

Seems to me like he's worse lately ... He got married a couple of weeks ago. Wife lives over in the boss's house. Seems like Curley is cockier'n ever since he got married. (13)

In addition to being a pugnacious individual, Curley is also extremely insecure and does not trust his attractive wife around the workers. Curley even accuses Slim of attempting to have an affair with his wife and is continually looking for her.

Curley's wife is depicted as an attractive, lonely woman, who is flirtatious and resents marrying Curley. In chapter two, Candy describes Curley's wife as "Purty" and tells George, "Well—she got the eye" (14). Candy is essentially saying that Curley's wife is flirtatious and seductive. He goes on to say, "I think Curley's married ... a tart" (14). Once Curley's wife enters the bunkhouse, Lennie cannot stop staring at her and mentions that she is pretty. George immediately chastises Lennie by saying,

Don't you even take a look at that bitch. I don't care what she says and what she does. I seen 'em poison before, but I never seen no piece of jail bait worse than her. You leave her be. (16).

Overall, Curley's wife is portrayed in a negative light and is described as being a "tart" and "jail bait." As the story progresses, Curley's wife is depicted as extremely lonely, and she cannot stand her life on the hostile, unforgiving ranch.

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While Curley is talked about more than he actually speaks, there is one scene in which he enters the bunk house on the pretense of looking for his wife.  This jealous action backfires on him as Slim confronts him:  "If you can't look after you own ---wife, what you expect me to do about it? You lay off me."  This turning the situation around embarrasses Curley who is attacked verbally by the others.  He turns his fear to rage at Lennie when he sees him laughing with the others:

What the hell you laughin' at?....Come on, ya big ba---.  Get up on your feet.  No big son---is gonna laugh at me.  I'll show ya who's yella.

As Curley punches Lennie, terror enters Lennie's face and he stands, hands down.  George orders Lennie to "get him" and Lennie grabs Curley's hand, crushing it with his brute strength.

Later on, Curley's wife, who has once before flirtatiously entered the bunk house, finds Lennie petting the puppies of Candy's dog.  Impressed by his strength against Curley, she asks if she can talk to him.  Lennie tries to rebuff her.

Listen...All the buys got a horseshoe tenement goin' on....None of them guys is goin'to leave that tenement.  Why can't I talk to you?  I never get to talk to nobody.  I get awful lonely....What's the matter with me?  Ani't I got a right to talk to nobody?...You're a nice guy....I ain't doin' no harm to you.

Then she encourages Lennie to feel her hair that is soft as a puppy's:  "Feel right aroun' there an' see how soft it is."  Of course, Lennie does so, but too tightly, frightening her.  As she struggles, Lennie tries to keep her from screaming and accidentally breaks her neck.

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