Butler says that "Bloodchild" is not about slavery. Why might someone think it is? How does it engage with issues of race and social power? Support your answer by quoting from the text.

In "Bloodchild" by Octavia Butler, because the Terrans are subjugated on a preserve and bought, sold, and traded by a different race, the Tlics, it is understandable that the situation seems analogous to slavery. Social power is definitely exemplified by the dynamic between the Tlics and the Terrans. The Tlic politician controls Gan and his family through the use of drugs, threats, and physical violence, interspersed with a pretended tenderness and willingness to engage in intimacy.

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Certain phrases and sentences in "Bloodchild" call to mind human beings being viewed and used as commodities; for example, in the opening,

T'Gatoi was hounded on the outside. Her people wanted more of us made available" and " the hordes...did not understand why there was a Preserve -why...

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Certain phrases and sentences in "Bloodchild" call to mind human beings being viewed and used as commodities; for example, in the opening,

T'Gatoi was hounded on the outside. Her people wanted more of us made available" and " the hordes...did not understand why there was a Preserve -why any Terran could not be courted, paid, drafted, in some way made available to them.

T'Gatoi could be likened to a slave trader, as she moved Terrans (earthlings, or humans) to "the desperate" and sold them to "the rich and powerful for their political support." This makes clear that the Terrans live in a socially divided world where some are bought, sold, and traded as goods. There is a ruling class defined by its wealth and power; they are the Tlics, an insect race. The Terrans, though, are at the same time "an independent people" and highly sought after by the Tlic, who need them for their convenience. At the same time, T'Gatoi has developed strong, related bonds with Gan and his family. This could be seen as analagous to slave masters who impregnated their slaves.

T'Gatoi is represented as a Tlic monster, a highly-placed politician, one who provides an egg that is an intoxicant that makes the Terrans relaxed and pliant and a sting that puts them to sleep. The Tlics make the Terrans do their bidding and will physically assault them to secure their compliance and then reward them with a sort of lethe. It is a control mechanism that the powerful race of Tlics is able to exert over the Terrans, thus evoking comparisons to slavery and exemplifying the dynamics of race and social power.

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