What is the difference between Keats's world and the world of nightingale in "Ode to a Nightingale"?

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In "Ode to a Nightingale ," Keats finds himself torn between a number of polarities: the temporal and the eternal, the spiritual and the material, and life and death. The song of the nightingale is eternal; it has resounded throughout history and shall continue to do so for ever...

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In "Ode to a Nightingale," Keats finds himself torn between a number of polarities: the temporal and the eternal, the spiritual and the material, and life and death. The song of the nightingale is eternal; it has resounded throughout history and shall continue to do so for ever more. Yet somehow Keats, as with all of us, must live in the temporal world, the world of time, the here and now. He frankly acknowledges the difficulty of resolving the ceaseless tension between his spiritual longings as represented by the "immortal bird," and his material, worldly existence.

Keats is so enraptured by the beauty of the nightingale's song that he muses that perhaps now would be a good time to die, to slip away quietly without pain or discomfort. Keats doesn't want to return to the ordinary world, especially not after the nightingale has provided him with a glimpse of the eternal sublime.

Succumbing to the drowsy summer's evening haze, the poet contemplates a death accompanied by the sound of the nightingale's song. But the song would eventually turn into a requiem, a mass for the dead. And like all such commemorations it would go unheard by the deceased. By this time, Keats would be buried far beneath the sod, or turf, while the nightingale would carry on merrily with its luscious serenade, blissfully unaware of the earthly death to which it had provide such a sweet accompaniment. In death, as in life, there can ultimately be no true reconciliation between the earthly and the sublime, between the respective worlds of Keats and the nightingale.

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This excellent poem creates a division between the world in which Keats is forced to live, which is characterised by pain, suffering and death, and the world of the nightingale, which is seen by Keats as a symbol of the eternal and of beauty itself, which remains unsullied by what happens in the earth below. consider how this division is introduced in the third stanza of this poem:

Fade far away, dissolve, and quite forget

What thou among the leaves hast never known,

The weariness, the fever, and the fret

Here, where men sit and hear each other groan;

Where palsy shakes a few, sad, last gray hairs,

Where youth grows pale, and spectre-thin, and dies...

Note the way that the nightingale lives "far away" where it is able to forget the kind of sights and experiences it has never known. Life for Keats and humans at large is characterised by "weariness," "fever" and "fret," all leading to eventual death. By contrast, if we look at the fourth stanza, we can see that the world of the nightingale is described as a fantastical place of enchantment with the "Queen-Moon" on her throne and "Clustered around by all her starry Fays." In contrast to the life of humans, the nightingale "wast not born for death" and is an "immortal bird." It has never had the experience of "hungry generations" treading it down.

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