Briefly describe the bunkhouse where George and Lennie stay in Of Mice and Men.

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The bunkhouse at the ranch in Soledad, California is described as a long, rectangular building with whitewashed walls and an unpainted floor. There are three small, square windows in three of the walls and a wooden door on the fourth wall. There are also eight bunks against the walls, and...

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The bunkhouse at the ranch in Soledad, California is described as a long, rectangular building with whitewashed walls and an unpainted floor. There are three small, square windows in three of the walls and a wooden door on the fourth wall. There are also eight bunks against the walls, and only five of the beds are made. Above each bunk is an open apple box nailed to the wall, which serves as a tiny shelf for the workers to store their smaller personal items. Near one wall is a black cast iron stove, and its stovepipe goes through the ceiling. In the middle of the room is a large square table, where the men gather around to play cards.

The bunkhouse is a rather bare, dust-laden building, where the migrant workers spend the majority of their leisure time. It is a solemn, foreboding place, which is not welcoming or comfortable. The small articles on the shelves of each apple box are the migrant workers' only possessions, which illustrates their difficult, transient lifestyles. Several significant events take place in the bunkhouse as the story progresses. Candy listens from his bunk as Carlson shoots his beloved dog and Curley fights Lennie inside the bunkhouse. George also confides in Slim while they are in the bunkhouse, and Curley's wife is continually making excuses to enter the bunkhouse.

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