In "The Bride Comes to the Yellow Sky," what type of characters are the men in the saloon?

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In “The Bride Comes to Yellow Sky” by Stephen Crane , five of the six men in the “Weary Gentleman” saloon represent the norms of the Old West. They are silent, stoic men. The narrator explains the three men from Texas choose not to talk in the saloon....

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In “The Bride Comes to Yellow Sky” by Stephen Crane, five of the six men in the “Weary Gentleman” saloon represent the norms of the Old West. They are silent, stoic men. The narrator explains the three men from Texas choose not to talk in the saloon. They are strong, silent types who hold their thoughts close to them. They speak when they feel it is necessary. The Mexicans are silent in the bar by their own choosing. They do not share their thoughts with others because they are outsiders in the town. They go to the bar to drink, not to socialize. When it becomes evident that Scratchy is on a rampage, they fade out the back door not wanting to be part of trouble. The drummer represents the eastern encroachment on the Wild West. He is talkative in a way that shows he does not understand the social norms of Yellow Sky. The bar keeper acts as the go between by attempting to explain Scratchy’s actions to the drummer and to keep him safe. He represents the bridge between the Old West and spread of eastern ideology brought about by the extension of railroads to the outermost western towns of the United States.

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