In "Brave New World", John’s eventual demise is not a defeat or an escape. It is an act of hope. Explain that statement.In "Brave New World", John’s eventual demise is not a defeat or...

In "Brave New World", John’s eventual demise is not a defeat or an escape. It is an act of hope. Explain that statement.

In "Brave New World", John’s eventual demise is not a defeat or an escape. It is an act of hope. Explain that statement.

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mwestwood eNotes educator| Certified Educator

John may be considered as a Christ-like figure in a satirical sense in "Brave New World."  He scourges himself to atone for his sins, and becomes the sacrificial victim of propaganda as throngs of curiosity seekers arrive.  Mustapha Mond realizes that John must go in order for him to maintain control of the New World.  After John's self-imposed death because of his failure to be so human-- his failure to resist having sex with Lenina-- Mond can exploit the situation to show that his control is superior.  So, to the World Leader John's death is an act of hope for the continuation of the New World as all dissenters have been removed by exile or death.

epollock | Student

I don't see John as a Christ figure at all simply because of what Post #1 stated. John wasn't interested in teaching morals or for even telling anyone the right path to choose, he was only interested in himself.

krishna-agrawala | Student

Comparing John to Christ in satirical or any other sense is giving too much credit to John. Crucifixion of Christ was not a suicide, it was just a natural consequence of insistence of sticking to truth. There are many examples of such incidents - for example - Socrates, Saint Joan, and Galileo.

Unlike these other great people, John was not interested in truth or good of others. He was only trying to achieve peace of mind for himself. His suicide was perhaps an attempt to end the miseries which he could bear no more.

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Brave New World

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