In A Boy at War, what is the main conflict and the resolution?

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A huge part of the human struggle of World War II was the rage of many Americans towards Japanese Americans who were already living the country when the attack on pearl harbor occurred. The contentious nature of this prejudice is reflected in the conflict of A Boy at War, as the protagonist, Adam, has a best friend and classmate who is a Japanese American named Davi.

Adam's father, a military man, orders Adam to stop spending time with Davi. Adam, however, knows that this sort of thinking is wrong, showing an extraordinary amount of maturity and compassion for his age and circumstance. However, his kind nature is put to the test when Davi and Adam are out fishing and the attack begins. Adam begins to understand the blind anger that Americans feel towards anyone Japanese and feels himself wanting to lash out at Davi. In the end, however, his better nature wins out, and he is able to overcome the animosity he briefly harbored for his friend.

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As the war with Japan becomes more and more likely, Adam's father tells him not to associate with Davi Mori, his friend who is a Japanese American. Adam knows this is odd but struggles with trying to be obedient to his father even though it runs contrary to the way he feels he ought to act.

Once the attack on Pearl Harbor happens and Adam sees his father's ship the USS Arizona sinking, knowing his father is likely still aboard, he feels an enormous rage at the enemy, the Japanese who have just stolen his father from him. He has to hold himself back from immediately attacking Davi since he looks like the enemy.

The resolution of this conflict comes when Adam is able to overcome his anger and the fear and suspicion he feels for Davi and the other Japanese Americans. His resolution comes in maintaining his friendship with Davi despite the many reasons he has to turn on him.

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