The Boy in the Striped Pajamas, by John Boyne. I am looking for examples showing that even the most horrific events can disappear through denial.I recently fnished The Boy in the Striped Pajamas,...

The Boy in the Striped Pajamas, by John Boyne. I am looking for examples showing that even the most horrific events can disappear through denial.

I recently fnished The Boy in the Striped Pajamas, by John Boyne. It was a excellent book, which portrays many different themes. My question is that I am looking for examples to support that~ even the most horrific events can disappear through denial. For example, on page 144, when Bruno's father says, " 'If it wasn't for history none of us would be sitting around this table now...We are correcting history here.' " This proves that he believes, the work he has done, and is doing with the Nazis is okay because he is convinved that they are correcting history. Does anyone have any other possible example that even the most horrific events can disappear through denial?

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cjorden | Teacher | (Level 1) eNoter

Posted on

Here are a couple of main themes:
1. Childhood Innocence. Although Shmuel and Bruno have a lot in commond the most significant is the childhood innocence which seems to characterize both boys. Bruno is unaware of his father's Nazi affiliation or that his home is near the border Auschwitz. Shmuel, although imprisoned, doesn't seem to grasp the severity of his situation. Shmuel doesn't realize that his father was sent to the gas chamber.
2. Boundaries. The story also explores both figurative and literal boundaries of life. Bruno and Shmuel are separated by a fence and complain that they can never play together. They are also separated by the strict rules that Germans (Nazi Germans) may not be friends with Jews, Poles, and any other groups persecuted by Hitler.
There are definitely more horrific events but these should get you started.

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