Boxer's cruel death is a result of Napoleon's tyrannical rule in Animal Farm. Though some animals recognize that they are living under tyranny...... why don't they act? Through examples, show what...

Boxer's cruel death is a result of Napoleon's tyrannical rule in Animal Farm. Though some animals recognize that they are living under tyranny...

... why don't they act? Through examples, show what lessons Orwell wanted to teach. Explain in detail, please.

Asked on by jaanaa

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bullgatortail | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

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Complacency, fear and simple-mindedness are just a few of the reasons the animals refused rise up against the tyrannical rule of the pigs in George Orwell's Animal Farm. Few of the animals understood that Boxer was being transported to the glue factory; even when told of the cruel deed by those who did recognize it, many of them would not have accepted the fact that Napoleon had ordered it. Their beliefs in the propaganda that the pigs perpetrated were stronger than their own natural instincts. The animals must have known that they stood no chance against the pigs and their dog enforcers, so they accepted the decision as just another act that served in the best interests of the farm. Events such as the spontaneous demonstrations and Moses' tales of Sugarcandy Mountain helped to erase the animals' memories of the treachery.

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