Bowra values poems that include plausibility, excitement, novelty, vividness, coherence, and relevance to human concern. See list below.Based on the above, which poems do you think Bowra would have...

Bowra values poems that include plausibility, excitement, novelty, vividness, coherence, and relevance to human concern. See list below.

Based on the above, which poems do you think Bowra would have liked from this list:

"from Songs of Innocence The Lamb"

"The Chimney Sweeper"

"The Little Boy Lost"

"The Little Boy Found"

"from Songs of Experience"

"The Tyger"

"The Chimney Sweeper"

"The Sick Rose"

"To a Mouse"

"To a Louse"

"The Lorelei"

"Lines Composed a Few Miles Above the Tintern Abbey"

"Composed upon Westminister Bridge, September 3, 1802"

"The World is Too Much with us"

"I Wandered Lonely as a child"

1 Answer | Add Yours

accessteacher's profile pic

accessteacher | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

Out of the poems you have selected I would immediately select Blake's "The Tyger" as being worthy of mention, as, to my mind, it fulfills the categories you have mentioned above that Bowra values. I have included a link to more information about this poem below, but hopefully the following comments will get you started.

This poem is both exciting and plausible in focusing on the tremendous energy that is represented in the figure of the tiger, which Blake uses as a symbol of revolutionary energy and zeal. Consider how the first stanza introduces the tiger:

Tiger! Tiger! Burning bright

Through the forests of the night

What immortal hand or eye

Can frame thy fearful symmetry.

The tiger is a creature that inspires fear and awe in those who contemplate his sleek grace and murderous urges. As far as the poem being relevant to the human concern, there is a definite link here. The poem asks the massive question of who could have created such a deadly animal as the tiger, and if one God created both such a force of darkness and the lamb, which is used in this poem as a force of goodness. This poem therefore seems to satisfy all the requirements listed above.

Sources:

We’ve answered 318,926 questions. We can answer yours, too.

Ask a question