In the book the outsiders, What does Ponyboy think a few times after reading sodapops letter?

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I think that your question might be better worded as, what does Ponyboy think after reading Sodapop's letter a few times? The letter you're referring to is the one that Sodapop, Ponyboy's older brother, has had delivered to him in an abandoned church. Ponyboy and Johnny are hiding in that...

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I think that your question might be better worded as, what does Ponyboy think after reading Sodapop's letter a few times? The letter you're referring to is the one that Sodapop, Ponyboy's older brother, has had delivered to him in an abandoned church. Ponyboy and Johnny are hiding in that church after Johnny kills a member of the rival soc gang.

The book does not reveal Pony's inner thoughts immediately after reading the letter. But it notes that Ponyboy reads the letter three or four times, a clue that it's important to him. He has not seen Soda in nearly a week, when Pony ran out of his house after his oldest brother, Darry, struck him during an argument. In the letter, Soda tells Pony that Darry is "awfully sorry" for hitting him, and that he did not mean to. He also urges Johnny and Pony to turn themselves in to the police.

Curiously, Ponyboy's first reaction is to mentally note Soda's spelling errors. This perhaps is not surprising considering Pony is intelligent and studious, with a chance to go to college. He is likely deflecting his emotions by focusing on something inconsequential. Then Pony abruptly shifts his focus to Dallas, the friend who brought them the letter, and asks why the police had questioned him. This draws the attention of his two friends away from the letter, which Dallas has possibly read, and helps Pony quell his feelings. If he feels sad, he is not going to show it in the presence of peers.

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In chapter 5, Dally visits Pony and Johnny at the abandoned church in Windrixville and gives Pony a letter from Sodapop. In the letter, Sodapop tells Pony that Darry is terribly sorry for hitting him and is extremely worried about his well-being. He also mentions that the police stopped by and questioned them about the murder. Sodapop then tells Pony that Dally refused to disclose their location and says that the entire situation is killing Darry. He also encourages Pony to turn himself in and mentions that he was featured in a newspaper article. Hinton does not expound upon Pony's thoughts after he reads Sodapop's letter but mentions that Ponyboy read it three or four times and commented on Sodapop's spelling. After reading Sodapop's letter, Pony asks Dally, "How come you got hauled in?" (Hinton, 71). One can infer that Pony is thinking about the consequences of his actions and is worried about the authorities. One can also infer that Pony is processing Sodapop's comments regarding Darry's feelings while simultaneously considering Dally's loyalty in their time of need.

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