In Monster by Walter Dean Myers, discuss the relevance of the the idea in the following quote:  “My job is to make sure the law works for you as well as against you, and to make you a human...

In Monster by Walter Dean Myers, discuss the relevance of the the idea in the following quote:  “My job is to make sure the law works for you as well as against you, and to make you a human being in the eyes of the jury.”

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Ashley Kannan | Middle School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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O'Brien's statement to Steve reveals a couple of things.  The first is that the quote shows O'Brien's intense desire to win, first and foremost.  She is not necessarily concerned with whether or not Steve is innocent.  She wants to win.  She is more concerned with what she can prove as opposed to what she knows.  It is here where her basic premise of how she wants to manipulate the law "to work" for Steve and also use what she can of the law to prove its ineffectiveness in the hope of getting an acquittal verdict for her client.  Her desire to make Stevie "a human" in front of the jury is motivated by O'Brien's understanding that if she is able to humanize her client in front of the jury, he stands a better chance of being acquitted for that which he is charged.  It is here where I think that the quote reflects O'Brien's intensity towards winning.  The interesting element here is that there is already confusion about what Stevie did or did not do.  This seems to be exacerbated by O'Brien's comment, which is reflective of how the legal system is not really concerned with innocence, but rather if one is "not guilty."  In this, O'Brien's quote is a compelling one.

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