In the book Of Mice and Men, what is Old Susy's Place?

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Susy's place is a brothel frequented by the migrant farm workers to whom George and Lennie are introduced at the beginning of Of Mice and Men. Old Susy herself is described as a likable character who often makes jokes without ever talking dirty. The establishment is also a place...

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Susy's place is a brothel frequented by the migrant farm workers to whom George and Lennie are introduced at the beginning of Of Mice and Men. Old Susy herself is described as a likable character who often makes jokes without ever talking dirty. The establishment is also a place where men can go and have drinks even if they do not want to engage the services of a prostitute.

Susy assures her patrons that her girls are clean and that "there ain't no water in [her] whisky." Her place is described as clean with nice chairs. We are told that Susy has five prostitutes working at her establishment.

Susy's place is the opposition, in business terms, to the establishment run by Clara. Clara's is more expensive than Susy's place, and the men don't like Clara as much as Susy because she doesn't make jokes with them and because she charges more.

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Susy’s place is a brothel. This place is significant in a few ways. First, this is the place where the men to go to deal with their stress. The men look forward to going to this place, because they are so lonely. The life of the migrant workers is described as filled with alienation. There are no friendships, no community, and little compassion for each other. So, Susy’s is a place where men can find things that they don’t have on the ranch.

The men describe the place as a place of laughter and comfort. There are nice chairs, and Susy does not kick out the men if they just want to sit there and relax.

We go in to old Susy’s place. Hell of a nice place. Old Susy’s a laugh—always crackin’ jokes. Like she says when we come up on the front porch las’ Sat’day night.

From this perspective, we can also say that Susy’s is a place of escape for the men.

Susy’s is also significant because it is when the men are there that Lennie, Candy, and Crooks have a conversation. This is one of the few places in the book where there is a sharing of hearts on a deeper level.

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