In the book Of Mice and Men, what do George and Lennie do for a living?  

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George and Lennie are both migrant workers who travel throughout the western United States looking for manual labor jobs in the middle of an economic depression. As migrant workers, George and Lennie struggle to find good-paying, steady jobs, where they will have an opportunity to save enough money to eventually buy their own homestead. At the beginning of the novella, George and Lennie are preparing to arrive at a ranch that is located a few miles south of Soledad, California. George also mentions that they were forced to flee from a ranch in Weed after Lennie was accused of assaulting a woman, which foreshadows his violent, unintentional interaction with Curley's wife towards the end of the novella. Unlike most migrant workers, George and Lennie enjoy a unique relationship as they travel and work together. George also acts as Lennie's caretaker because Lennie is mentally disabled.

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George and Lennie are migrant farm workers.  This means that they travel from farm to farm, hiring themselves out as temporary labor.  Usually, migrant workers travel along with the seasons of the crops.  George and Lennie go from farm to farm looking for work.  In California in the 1930s this was quite common.  It was a hard life though, because farm workers did not make much and had to do hard work.  Picking crops is uncomfortable work.  George generally chose the assignments based on rumor and what they happened to come across.  It was typical for migrant workers to go looking for work and stop only when they found it, until the work was done when they would move on to the next one.

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