A Man for All Seasons by Robert Bolt

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In the play "A Man for All Seasons" what were Thomas More's reasons for not assenting to the acts of supremacy and of succession?

In the play "A Man for All Seasons" what were Thomas More's reasons for not assenting to the acts of supremacy and of succession?

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Essentially More is an Honest man, as King Henry VIII points out to him in their conversation early in Act 1.  That need to remain honest extended from a fear of going to hell.  This was the 16th century and everyone, even the King himself fully believed that they would be judged by God for their actions.  Henry got himself in a lather over the reading from Leviticus that said Thou shalt not uncover the nakedness of thy brother's wife.  He wanted a son as the throne was not believed secure under a woman at this time.

People also believed that bad luck was a sign of God's disatisfaction with you.  Henry took the absence of a living son (Sons were wither stillborn or died in infancy) as Punishment for imploring...

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