In the book To Kill a Mockingbird, what does Miss Gates say about Hitler's persecution of the Jews? 1. that it was a good thing 2. that it was similar to racism in maycomb 3.that it was terrible...

In the book To Kill a Mockingbird, what does Miss Gates say about Hitler's persecution of the Jews?

1. that it was a good thing

2. that it was similar to racism in maycomb

3.that it was terrible

4. that it's to be expected

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readerofbooks | College Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

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This is a good question. Miss Gates clearly says that what Hitler is doing is a deplorable thing. She hears about the atrocities and denounces it to her class. In fact, she is quite self-righteous, as she compares Germany to America. In effect, she says that Americans would never do such a thing, because we are a democratic nation, whereas Germany is a dictatorship. 

Here is what the text says:

Then Miss Gates said, “That’s the difference between America and Germany. We are a democracy and Germany is a dictatorship. Dictator-ship,” she said. “Over here we don’t believe in persecuting anybody. Persecution comes from people who are prejudiced. Prejudice,” she enunciated carefully. “There are no better people in the world than the Jews, and why Hitler doesn’t think so is a mystery to me.”

The irony of what she says, of course, is that Maycomb is racist community. To make matters even starker in contrast, her perspective on Hitler takes place right after the unfair trial of Tom Robinson and after his death in prison. The children, like Scout and Jem, clearly see the injustices, but Miss Gates is blind to them. 

Atticus, in an earlier chapter, says that all people have blind spots. We can say that Miss Gates has a huge blindspot. This is clear to the children and the reader. 

Sources:

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