In To Kill a Mockingbird, how is Scout courageous throughout the book?

Expert Answers

An illustration of the letter 'A' in a speech bubbles

Scout demonstrates courage several times in the story. Scout courageously challenges anyone who criticizes her father and even gets into a physical altercation with her cousin after he calls Atticus a "nigger-lover." The fact that Scout is willing to defend her family members at all cost is an admirable trait,...

Unlock
This Answer Now

Start your 48-hour free trial to unlock this answer and thousands more. Enjoy eNotes ad-free and cancel anytime.

Start your 48-Hour Free Trial

Scout demonstrates courage several times in the story. Scout courageously challenges anyone who criticizes her father and even gets into a physical altercation with her cousin after he calls Atticus a "nigger-lover." The fact that Scout is willing to defend her family members at all cost is an admirable trait, which emphasizes her courage. Scout also demonstrates courage by facing her fears and following Jem and Dill into the Radley yard during their nighttime raid. Despite being terrified of Boo Radley, Scout refuses to back out and participates in the nighttime raid. Scout's most courageous moment takes place in chapter 15 when she runs into the middle of a lynch mob and tries to strike up a conversation with Mr. Cunningham. Even though Scout does not comprehend the seriousness of the situation, she comes to Jem's defense by kicking a man in the groin. Scout also demonstrates courage by challenging her Aunt Alexandra when she disrespects Walter Cunningham. In chapter 24, Scout once again demonstrates courage by participating in the missionary circle and attempting to socialize with the local ladies. As a rough tomboy, Scout feels extremely uncomfortable but maintains her composure during the stressful event.

Approved by eNotes Editorial Team
An illustration of the letter 'A' in a speech bubbles

Scout's most courageous act in To Kill a Mockingbird comes in Chapter 15 when she and Jem arrive at the jail while Atticus is confronting the lynch mob. Scout senses that something is wrong, but she doesn't really understand the implications of the gathering until the next day. Her innocent banter with Walter Cunningham shames him, and he directs the other men to "Let's get going."

Scout shows courage when she stands up for Walter Cunningham Jr. on her first day of school. She tries to explain why Walter has no lunch money, but she instead gets in trouble with Miss Caroline. She shows courage when she accompanies Jem and Scout into the Radley's back yard, and she shows her speed when she runs back to safety after Boo's shadow appears on the porch. She shows courage (or is it her foolish hot temper?) each and every time she fights a boy in the schoolyard, and her bravery is evident when she runs to the sound of Jem's screams during the attack by Bob Ewell.

Approved by eNotes Editorial Team