In the book Jane Eyre, Jane's trait is tolerance. How and where is this trait revealed in the text?Find and write down the quote of where she is being tolerant and also write down the context. The...

In the book Jane Eyre, Jane's trait is tolerance. How and where is this trait revealed in the text?

Find and write down the quote of where she is being tolerant and also write down the context. The chapters where you find them have to be between chapter 1 and chapter 12

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accessteacher | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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It is interesting that you think Jane Eyre is a "tolerant" character. I would disagree. Particularly in the first few chapters whilst she is in Gateshead with the Reeds, she shows she is anything but "tolerant". One example would be in the very first chapter where she "flies" at her cousin John, and is described as being "like a wild cat" and has to be threatened with being "tied down" to a chair to calm her. Yet, one of the important things to remember about the novel is that it traces the development of the central character, Jane Eyre, and where she does begin to learn more about tolerance is during her time at Lowood, and primarily, thanks to the influence of her friend, Helen Burns.

In Chapter Six, following Jane's observation of how Helen is abused by Miss. Scatcherd, Jane shares her feelings:

"But I feel this, Helen: I must dislike those who, whatever I do to please them, persist in disliking me; I must resist those who punish me unjustly. It is as natural as that I should love those who show me affection, or submit to punishment when I feel it is deserved."

Here we see Jane's strong commitment to justice and to telling the truth, which we previously saw in her confrontation with her aunt, Mrs. Reed. Yet we also see in the very next chapter, when Rev. Brocklehurst punishes Jane unjustly by making her stand on a stool and denouncing her as a liar, Jane has started to moderate her character by becoming more tolerant in the face of injustice:

I mastered the rising hysteria, lifted up my head, and took a firm stand on the stool.

Helen Burns is able to teach Jane Eyre to be more tolerant, and by her presence to help Jane master her emotions and passions - a key theme in the novel.

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