In the book Jane Eyre, Janes' trait is tolerant. How is this trait revealed in the text? Please give the chapter where you found it and the page #?find and write down the qoute of where she is...

In the book Jane Eyre, Janes' trait is tolerant. How is this trait revealed in the text? Please give the chapter where you found it and the page #?

find and write down the qoute of where she is being tolerant and also the context

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coachingcorner's profile pic

coachingcorner | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Senior Educator

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In the novel Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte, one area in which the young governess Jane shows her tolerant side, is with her little charge Adele. In real life, the Brontes were not known for being overly fond of their pupils (in one letter Charlotte refers to them as 'dullards!') - however in the story Jane comes to enjoy her tutelage of Adele. The little girl is missing her glamourous French mother and has developed some challenging impetuous and demanding character traits. 'Shall we be happy Madamoiselle?' she asks. Jane Eyre, with characteristic tolerance and gentle firmness, replies 'We shall work hard and we shall be content.' It is worth your while looking this up yourself,as obviously, the more familiar you are with the text - the higher marks you will get. I will enclose a link to guide you.

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mstokes | College Teacher | (Level 1) Valedictorian

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Prejudices, it is well known, are most difficult to eradicate from the heart whose soil has never been loosened or fertilized by education; they grow there, firm as weeds among stones (Jane Eyre) Jane develops tolerance from the various “teachers” she meets. These include Helen Burns and Miss Temple. But in relation to one scene and one quote regarding tolerance the following might suffice -As Mrs. Reed is lying on her deathbed, Jane once more attempts, as she did as a child  to reconcile with her aunt. Her aunt repels her with cutting remarks (page 357 in my edition). Jane, having more tolerance then many in her position after being insulted, states, “Love me, then, or hate me, as you will…you have my full and free forgiveness: ask now for God’s and be at peace” (my ed. Pp.357-358).

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