In Guns, Germs, and Steel, Diamond offers two tribes, the Chimbu and the Daribi, as examples of differing receptivities to innovation.  How problematic are cultural factors like this for Diamond's...

In Guns, Germs, and Steel, Diamond offers two tribes, the Chimbu and the Daribi, as examples of differing receptivities to innovation.  How problematic are cultural factors like this for Diamond's arguments?

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pohnpei397 | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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According to Diamond, these cultural factors do not impact his overall argument in any way.  Instead, they actually make "the historian's task paradoxically easier (p. 254 in the paperback edition)."

The reason for this is that, Diamond argues, these cultural factors are distributed in a completely random way.  Diamond says that every continent has, at one time or another, some cultures that reject innovation and some that embrace it.  This makes culture a random variable.  Cultures randomly embrace or reject technology.  Therefore, no one continent always embraces it or always rejects it.  This means that there is no problem because it is not as if some continents gained an advantage because of its culture and there is no problem for Diamond's argument.

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