In Frankenstein, why does Victor turn to the study of mathematics, and what prevents him from continuing this study? Frankenstein chapter 2 and 3

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In Chapter 2 of Frankenstein, Victor begins the study of mathematics, but it is "destiny" that causes him to change his course of study to natural philosophy:

Before this I was not unacquainted with the more obvious laws of electricity. On this occasion a man of great research in natural philosophy was with us, and, excited by this catastrophe, he entered on the explanation of a theory which he had formed on the subject of electricity and galvanism, which was at once new and astonishing to me. All that he said threw greatly into the shade Cornelius Agrippa, Albertus Magnus, and Paracelsus, the lords of my imagination; but by some fatality the overthrow of these men disinclined me to pursue my accustomed studies. It seemed to me as if nothing would or could ever be known. All that had so long engaged my attention suddenly grew despicable. By one of those caprices...

(The entire section contains 452 words.)

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