In the book Animal Farm, what are a few similarities and differences between the rulings of Napoleon and Mr. Jones?

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There isn't a huge amount of difference in the way that Mr. Jones and Napoleon treat the farm animals. Neither of them could care less about the animals's welfare. However, Napoleon is much more ruthless and efficient than his human predecessor. His cruelty towards the animals is systematic and unrelenting,...

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There isn't a huge amount of difference in the way that Mr. Jones and Napoleon treat the farm animals. Neither of them could care less about the animals's welfare. However, Napoleon is much more ruthless and efficient than his human predecessor. His cruelty towards the animals is systematic and unrelenting, driven by a fanatical ideology which, ironically, is supposed to liberate the animals from oppression.

Napoleon is also much more clever than Mr. Jones, who spends most of his time getting drunk instead of attending to the farm. Though as we will discover later on in the story, Napoleon comes to develop a taste for alcohol himself, which he indulges on a regular basis after cynically changing one of the Seven Commandments of Animalism from "No animal shall drink alcohol" to "No animal shall drink alcohol to excess."

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I would suggest that they are identical, at least in performance.  Mr. Jones makes no pretense of creating a better world, a new social order, for the animals.  He is a capitalist.  He takes care of the animals when it is to his advantage.  The animals seem OK with this until the speech of the Old Major.

Napoleon, on the other hand, is one of them.  He uses the idealism of the Old Major to convince the animals that there is something better for them and that he can deliver it to them.  In this way, he is worse than Jones who made no pretext of improving the lot of the animals.  In fact, he creates and entire class of leeches that live off the work of the rest of the animals.

Give me Jones.  At least we know what we're getting.

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The similarities in Napoleoen, the pig, and Mr. Jones are many.  They both run the farm from a totalitarian point of view.  They give the animals only the bare rations that need to stay alive.  The dogs are the constant companion of both and serve them unquestionably.

The differences come in terms of gradualism.  Napoleon has to gradually wipe away memories of what was promised to the animals after Old Major's speech and the revolution.  Jones did not this; he never pretended to be equal to the the animals.  The pigs are a little different by changing the meaning of the word equal with the oxymoron:''All animals are equal , but some are more equal than others."

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The similarities: Both regimes are totalitarian states, one run by a Monarchy, one by a Dictatorship.  They repress the population by a lack of education, brutal work conditions and lack of food.  This keeps the working animals looking for survival more than anything else.  At the end, when the animals cannot tell the difference between the pigs and the Mr. Jones, it is meant to represent that the other animals just traded one harsh reality for another, and their lives are no different

The differences: While Mr. Jones represents a top down type of repression, with Napoleon in place, the animals feel, at the beginning, that they are in control of their destiny.  At the end they find out differently.

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