For the book Of Mice and Men: Present the conflicts. The conflict is usually the heart of the story and revolves around the main character. What are the external and internal conflicts that the...

For the book Of Mice and Men:

Present the conflicts. The conflict is usually the heart of the story and revolves around the main character. What are the external and internal conflicts that the characters have to struggle with?

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shake99 | Teacher | (Level 3) Senior Educator

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In John Steinbeck's novella Of Mice and Men, the main characters of George and Lennie have conflicts with each other as well as with other characters in the story.

We see an external conflict between George and Lennie early in the story when Lennie wants ketchup with his beans. This frustrates George and Lennie threatens to leave and wander off by himself.

Most of the conflict, however, involves George/Lennie together against another character. With Curley, for example, there is a conflict that actually becomes physical. Curley, apparently jealous of Lennie's size, picks a fight with Lennie. Before Lennie begins fighting, we see internal conflict on his part in the form of indecision: should he fight back or not? When George tells Lennie to "get him," Lennie mauls the smaller man.

Perhaps the most important conflict is the internal conflict George must grapple with at the end of the story, after Lennie has accidentally killed Curley's wife. This internal conflict is not clearly defined for the reader until we actually see George put a gun to Lennie's head and kill him to spare him from the other men who plan to hunt him down.

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