Bibliography I am trying to do a Bibliography, and I used some of the sources on enotes. When I hit the cite button, it came up with... "The Poetry of Robert Frost" Identities and Issues in Literature. Ed. David Peck. Salem Press, Inc., 1997. eNotes.com. 21 Apr, 2012 <http://www.enotes.com/poetr-robert-frost-salem/> Yet the English course I'm taking always shows the authors name first, then the year, then the name of the book, etc.  Which is correct? Also in the first citation above, is "The Poetry of Robert Frost" the name of a book or paper, or is Identities and issues in Literature the name of the book or paper? Thanks!

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Here is a perfect example of the nuances of English. There are many different ways to cite (MLA, APA, Chicago, Oxford, Harvard, and ASA). Knowing which format to use can be confusing. The best suggestion I can give is to always ask what format needs to be used.

Outside of that, I have to agree with wannam (and other posters following the MLA format). Typically, a the author's name (last name first) begins the citation. When missing the author's name, the title of the article will begin the citation.

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In response to post 3, I have never heard of putting the sponsoring entity instead of the author.  Then again, I'm really only familiar with MLA style so perhaps that is something from APA or another style of citation.  In most cases, I would suggest following the given format of skipping an unidentified author's name and starting with the article title.  This is the current standard for MLA at least.

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David Peck is the editor, but not necessarily the primary writer of the article.  That is why his name appears after the article title as Ed. David Peck.  Also--If you are using MLA format, you do not necessarily have to put the URL in the angle brackets.  You can put the word 'web.' before the date accessed and leave it at that.   The date should have a period after Apr, not a comma.

MLA web citation:

"The Poetry of Robert Frost." Identities and Issues in Literature. Ed. David Peck. Salem Press, Inc., 1997. eNotes. web. 21 Apr. 2012.

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I was taught that when a text is unattributed to a particular editor, as is the case in enotes, the "author" is the entity that sponsors the writing.  This often occurs on the Internet.  When doing research on medical problems, for example, Mayo Clinic does not always provide the name of an author for information provided, so the author would be Mayo Clinic. 

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It may depends on which style you are using, but if you are doing a bibliography, the editor does come after the edited volume in most styles. But usually, you would put the author of the selection first. Since that is not available in this case, I believe your best recourse would be to cite it as is. So they are both correct from a style standpoint.. 

As for your second question, "The Poetry of Robert Frost" is the title of the essay, Identities and issues in Literature is the title of the book that it came from. I have been unable to figure out who wrote the specific essay, though.

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