Describe the elements of the communication process between teacher and student in the classroom.  

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The communication process, as described by many mass communication theorists, consists of a sender, a message, a recipient, and background noise or interference. These models originated in the days when two-way radio was a primary means of communication, and noise referred to the static in the background.

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The communication process, as described by many mass communication theorists, consists of a sender, a message, a recipient, and background noise or interference. These models originated in the days when two-way radio was a primary means of communication, and noise referred to the static in the background.

Let us consider a typical scenario in a classroom, in which a teacher is presenting a lesson. In this situation, the teacher is the sender, as he or she is speaking and hopes to be heard by his or her audience. The message is the subject matter at hand—be it history, math, or any other subject.

The students are the recipients of this message, as they are (hopefully) the ones listening to the information being imparted.

The background noise or interference could be kids talking while the teacher is giving his/her lesson.

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Communication theorists have many different models of communication processes. Most share though, four key elements, sender, recipient, medium, and message.

Sender: In a lecture class the teacher is normally the sender, but in discussion, or even when students ask questions or submit homework, students may also take the role of senders.

Recipient: Students are assumed to be recipients in many classes, but in upper level seminars and graduate school, the teachers and students are more likely to participate equally as senders and recipients.

Medium: Although the main medium of classroom instruction is oral, many other media are also used, especially in technology enabled classrooms. In so far as students read books and write assignments and use websites that contribute to the learning process, other media are part of the classroom experience as background even during purely oral interactions.

Message: The message is the content of the course.

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