Besides Teiresias's predictions, what other examples of the foreshadowing of the shepherd's revelations do we find in Oedipus Rex?

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Jocasta claims that she knows that there is no reason to believe in prophets, and she tells the story of her husband, Laius, who received a prophecy that—she claims—never came to fruition. She explains that he was not murdered by his son, as the prophet said, but

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Jocasta claims that she knows that there is no reason to believe in prophets, and she tells the story of her husband, Laius, who received a prophecy that—she claims—never came to fruition. She explains that he was not murdered by his son, as the prophet said, but

Was murdered on a day by highwaymen,
No natives, at a spot where three roads meet.

When Oedipus hears this detail of the former king's death, he is immediately thrown into emotional turmoil. He says that a "wild tumult" came over his soul when he heard Jocasta say this. She reveals that it was just a "brief while" before Oedipus was made the ruler of Thebes. Jocasta describes Laius, at Oedipus's request, even suggesting that Laius was "not unlike" Oedipus in build and looks. Oedipus begins to fear that he has laid a "dread curse" on himself. Jocasta's revelations concerning Laius's death and his appearance certainly foreshadow the truths which have yet to come out. Oedipus's own dread does as well.

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In Oedipus, we do have some kind of foreshadowing of the final revelation even before the prophet arrives. Look at the declaration of curses from the King's mouth.  It starts to become clear that a revelation is coming.   

After Teiresias leaves, Oedipus and Creon get in a major fight regarding the news Creon brings--that the murderer of Laius is living in Thebes and must be removed.  In that discussion, the words banish and exile are bandied about by the two of them and  even the chorus.

Jocasta actually tells the story of Oedipus and his birth, which of course is a direct foreshadowing of the events which will soon be revealed.  Then Oedipus tells his story, adding to the depth of the upcoming revelation. 

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Foreshadowing is the suggestion or hint of what is to come. We can often seen foreshadowing in recurring motifs, coincidences, or even noteworthy phrases in dialogue.

One instance of foreshadowing Oedipus's upcoming grievous revelations and tragic fall can be seen earlier in the play when Oedipus is speaking to the priest about what should be done to end their current plague. Oedipus consoles the priest and his people by telling them that he is already well aware of their state of grief and that it is grieving him as well while he tries to think of a solution, as we see in his lines:

you do not wake me from sleep,
but know that I have been weeping much
and wandering many roads of the mind. (70-72)

His opening line in this passage is particularly interesting because it foreshadows what Teiresias warns him. Teiresias accuses Oedipus of being blind to his own situation and of not realizing what he has done and with whom he is living with. Sleep is very similar to blindness because both refer to a state of closed, unseeing eyes. Hence, it is ironic that Oedipus says his citizens have not awaken him from "sleep" because the reality is that he is completely blind to his circumstances, as if he has been living all these years asleep. Not only is it ironic, it also foreshadows Oedipus's upcoming revelation, or wakefulness, by referring to Oedipus's state of mind as being awake rather than asleep.

In addition, the phrase "wandering many roads of the mind" is also a very important foreshadowing line. We later learn that the word "roads" is an important reference as Laius was killed at crossroads leading to Delphi. Hence, "wandering many roads of the mind" not only symbolizes Laius's death but also foreshadows Oedipus's upcoming revelation about what crime he committed on the road towards Delphi and whom he committed the crime against.

A second interesting instance of foreshadowing can be seen in Oedipus's conversation with Creon immediately after Creon returns from Delphi. Creon informs Oedipus that Laius was said to have been killed by "bandits," plural, "not with one man’s strength, but the hands of many" (133-134). However, interestingly, even though Creon referred to "bandits," plural, Oedipus asks, "How did a bandit come to dare so much, unless he acted with money from here?" (135-136). In other words, even though Creon refers to multiple bandits, Oedipus turns things around and only asks about one singular "bandit." This line interestingly foreshadows the truth about Laius's murder that is soon to be revealed, which is that Laius was not really killed by multiple bandits, but by one person--Oedipus himself.

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