Beloved, thou has brought me many flowers XLIV sonnetWhich, in your opinion, is the most powerful image in this sonnet and why?    

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accessteacher's profile pic

accessteacher | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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The main comparison being made in this sonnet is the flowers that the speaker of the poem has received from her beloved which are compared to the gift that she offers him in return: her verse. This creates an extended metaphor that runs throughout the second half of this poem.

mwestwood's profile pic

mwestwood | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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The single image of flowers prevails throughout the sonnet since it acts as the controlling metaphor.  For, the "flower" is the speaker's love that yet has the "roots" of her lover, but foolishly he/she "withdrew" from "my heart's ground."  Now, with rue, the speaker asks the lover to preserve the ivy and eglantine that await the former lover's weeding.  The speaker hopes the lover will return. 

pohnpei397's profile pic

pohnpei397 | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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In my opinion, the most powerful image in this sonnet is the one contained in the following lines.

Indeed, those beds and bowers

Be overgrown with bitter weeds and rue,

And wait thy weeding;

I think this is the most powerful image because it shows clearly how much the speaker needs the person being addressed.

In these lines, the speaker is comparing her (presumably) heart to a bed of flowers that has been overgrown with bad plants.  The word "bitter" is especially powerful here.  The speaker says that one thing is needed -- she needs her love to come and weed out the bad and restore her heart to health.

lolaaoua's profile pic

lolaaoua | Student, Undergraduate | (Level 3) eNoter

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THANK YOU VERY MUCH

 

Is the speaker happy to receive her beloved's flowers? What does she think of the flowers?

lolaaoua's profile pic

lolaaoua | Student, Undergraduate | (Level 3) eNoter

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Beloved, thou hast brought me many flowers

Plucked in the garden, all the summer through

And winter, and it seemed as if they grew

In this close room, nor missed the sun and showers,

So, in the like name of that love of ours,

Take back these thoughts which here unfolded too,

And which on warm and cold days I withdrew

From my heart’s ground. Indeed, those beds and bowers

Be overgrown with bitter weeds and rue,

And wait thy weeding; yet here’s eglantine,

Here’s ivy!— take them, as I used to do

Thy flowers, and keep them where they shall not pine.

Instruct thine eyes to keep their colours true,

And tell thy soul, their roots are left in mine.

 

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