Bella gives Edward Mortality (Spoiler if you haven't read)I know that Edward and Bella's eternal love story focuses on Bella becoming (or not becoming in Edward's opinion) immortal, but does...

Bella gives Edward Mortality (Spoiler if you haven't read)

I know that Edward and Bella's eternal love story focuses on Bella becoming (or not becoming in Edward's opinion) immortal, but does anyone else notice how much more "human" Bella makes Edward's existance? It really makes me smile--They meet in class (as lab partners nonetheless!) and become high school sweethearts, they go to prom together,plan to attend college together, have a dream wedding and a beautiful child together. And for that matter, the rest of the Cullens get to be more human as well. I just think that Bella's human existance did just as much for Edward and the rest of the Cullens as immortality did for Bella and her and Edward's relationship.

I say she gives him Mortality in the sense that those experiences are very "human," and there is only one chance that all the other experiences would emanate from the first experience of meeting in HS as lab partners...Immortal or not.

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slchanmo1885 | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator

Posted on

I completely agree! I think these are wonderful observations. Edward and his family were living a life on the fringe of human life, pretending to belong but not really involved. Bella changed that in many ways. Just as Edward wanted to make sure that she did not miss out on human experiences, her existence made him become involved in human experiences as well. I also think that her presence reminded him of what it was like to be human, and made him have very real human feelings of love, fear, worry, and joy. When one is immortal, there isn't much to lose, but because Edward had Bella to love and protect, all of a sudden there was a whole lot more for him to lose. He also had to make a very important choice -- did he give into his non-human side, the vampire side, and give into the temptation of wanting to kill Bella? Or did he choose a more human choice, to love her and live with her and worry for her safety? He chose to be with her, therefore turning his back on vampire instincts and opening himself up to a more dangerous and joyous future together. 

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ask996 | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Senior Educator

Posted on

You make some good observations, but mortality is not the word you want to use when labeling these ideas. The root mort=death. Edward does give Bella immortality, but he is still unable to die so he has immortality as well. She humanizes him in that she makes him more humane, kind, or gentle. In addition she adds to his human qualities by engaging his jealousy with her interaction with Jacob. She makes him more human in that she teaches him that it is okay to love, dream, and feel emotions for others. She also humanizes him in that she forces him to choose between his own wants and needs and her own wants and needs. This is why the series of Meyer's books are so extraordinarily successful because Meyers address elements of the fantasy world, but she makes them seem plausible through the development of very realistic and humanized characters.

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bookgroupie | eNotes Newbie

Posted on

You make some good observations, but mortality is not the word you want to use when labeling these ideas. The root mort=death. Edward does give Bella immortality, but he is still unable to die so he has immortality as well. She humanizes him in that she makes him more humane, kind, or gentle. In addition she adds to his human qualities by engaging his jealousy with her interaction with Jacob. She makes him more human in that she teaches him that it is okay to love, dream, and feel emotions for others. She also humanizes him in that she forces him to choose between his own wants and needs and her own wants and needs. This is why the series of Meyer's books are so extraordinarily successful because Meyers address elements of the fantasy world, but she makes them seem plausible through the development of very realistic and humanized characters.

I agree that mortality is not the correct word for labeling their experiences, but I was not labeling them as mortality-just used that for the title. I used that title because I wanted to dramatically catagorize those experiences because, for me, Bella gave Edward everything the he did not want herto miss in life. I do know that he too is immortal and what immortal means. I agree that she made him more human, but, for me, it was so much more dramatic than that...so much so that he (the dismal, pessimistic, relatively young vampire who didn't get to really experience being human) died (figuratively) and was reborn, seemingly humanistic, through these human experiences. The only reason I used "mortal" is because I think its clear that she made him more human, but it was much more than that; the things that you listed could've been possible with any woman, but you only get one chance in "life" to meet a "soul mate" and have what Bella and Edward have in a human, mortal lifetime.

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