The title is A Doll House rather than A Doll's House, and this might be significant because you could argue that Nora is not the only doll.

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Nora isn't the only doll in this house because she has made her children dolls as well. When they return from playing outside (right before Krogstad appears for a private visit with Nora in Act 1), she calls Emmy "my sweet little babydoll" and all three of the children "my pretty little dollies." Nora takes off their coats and hats as though she were undressing dolls and then proceeds to play hide-and-seek with them as if she were playing with dolls herself.

Nora has little idea of how to be a mother, having had only Anne Marie to serve in that role. Now Anne Marie continues in that position with Nora's children. Is Anne Marie also responsible for making Nora a doll? Her stunted personality development is typically attributed to her father and Helmer, but I think the nurse has a role as well. 

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Ah I see, that's a good point. Is Nora a doll or not? This may be the central idea behind the story. Either title could work but the one you suggest "The Dollhouse" is more of a stark contrast, showing that Nora, who is not a doll, must escape living like one.

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Personally I don't see that there's a real difference between the different intepretations of the title. Is there a material difference between "A Dollhouse" "A Doll's House" or even "The Dollhouse"? It doesn't affect the meaning, I don't think.

I'm with you. If someone does have an argument for why there is a difference, please enlighten us. This discussion is very interesting.

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Personally I don't see that there's a real difference between the different intepretations of the title. Is there a material difference between "A Dollhouse" "A Doll's House" or even "The Dollhouse"? It doesn't affect the meaning, I don't think.

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Not getting into the translation, but arguing the validity of the choices:

While Nora is the only doll in the house, I think A Doll's House is an appropriate title for the story.  She is the doll, and the house is of her creation.  She realizes this at the end.  She has allowed herself to be established in the role of the doll - she allowed her father to treat her that way and she has allowed Helmer to do the same.  More so than allowed, she has played the game with them, using it to her advantage.  She is the creator of her house and her decision to leave her marriage house at the end is symbolic of her decision to leave the role she created for herself.

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You may be right, but this is still the fault of the various translators and it indeed exists in both forms.  As for the proper Norwegian, geez, I am only proficient in English, get by in French, and can successfully order a beer in Spanish.  :)

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This is a good point, and one I've addressed before, but here is my understanding.  The title has been translated as both "A Doll House" and as "A Doll's House."  I've even seen it translated as "A Dolls House," though to me this is the poorest interpretation. In any case, the original Norweigan is difficult to translate and a choice is made on the part of the individual translator.

Your take is certainly valid, but if you argue the other side, you might postulate that the possessive is true, that Nora lives in a superficial, closed world, treated as an object rather than a real person. 

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