In the beginning of chapter 7 of Lord of the Flies, by William Golding, in the paragraph beginning, "Here, on the other side..." and the paragraph which follows it, the movement of the ocean is...

In the beginning of chapter 7 of Lord of the Flies, by William Golding, in the paragraph beginning, "Here, on the other side..." and the paragraph which follows it, the movement of the ocean is emphasized through the author's repeated use of:

a. Extended metaphors

b. Participles

c. Hyperbole

d. Gerunds

e. Similes

Asked on by Erika015

2 Answers | Add Yours

mwestwood's profile pic

mwestwood | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

While there are metaphors and a simile present in these two paragraphs, the use of hyperbole is much more prevalent. Here are some examples of such obvious exaggeration in the description of the area on the other side of the mountain:

  • 'The view on the other side of the island is "utterly different."
  • The horizon is a "hard, chipped blue."
  • After Ralph descends to the rocks and is practically on a level with the sea, "you could follow...."the ceaseless, bulging passage" of the deep waves.
  • The waterfalls send down water that "rise[s] with a roar, irresistibly swelling."
  • On this side the "brute obtuseness of the ocean...one was condemned"(In other words, one has no chance of rescue because of the waves and danger of the ocean on this side of the island.)
Sources:
rmhope's profile pic

rmhope | College Teacher | (Level 3) Educator

Posted on

These two paragraphs use extended metaphors to emphasize the movement and the size of the ocean waves. Both paragraphs give human qualities to the ocean, and in that way the paragraphs personify the sea, comparing it to a living human being. Several phrases grant the waves intent or personality, making them a sentient thing. They have "an air of disregarding it and being set on other business." The ocean has a "brute obtuseness." Several physical characteristics of a person are mentioned as well. There is "an arm of surf" and "fingers of spray," and the waves "plaster down the seaweed like shining hair." Motions that parallel what a person can do are described: "the sea would suck down," the waves "traveled," the sea climbs up a little cliff. Finally, the sea "paus[es], gather[s] and rise[s] with a roar." All of these descriptions together form an extended metaphor that makes the ocean seem like a thinking, living creature, but one that is impersonal and irresistible. 

Present participles--"ing" words--are used in the first paragraph primarily, and that helps give the idea of the continuous motion of the waves. The following words give that image: "making," "pausing," swelling," climbing," and "sending." There are past participles--"ed" words--in the second paragraph, but they don't help emphasize the movement of the ocean.

Similes and gerunds are not used repeatedly in the passage. Although hyperbole is subjective, the passage does not seem to contain very much hyperbole. The ocean is "miles wide," and the waves are "ceaseless." 

"Extended metaphors" is the best answer here.

Sources:

We’ve answered 318,917 questions. We can answer yours, too.

Ask a question