At the beginning of Act I, what behavior of Nora's does Torvald express concern about?

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Torvald gives Nora many nicknames, most noticeably in the first act of the play. "Spendthrift" and "Miss Sweet-Tooth" are both so-called terms of endearment that Torvald uses to address Nora; however, these nicknames are extremely revealing. 

One of the first things Nora does in the play is to ask Torvald...

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Torvald gives Nora many nicknames, most noticeably in the first act of the play. "Spendthrift" and "Miss Sweet-Tooth" are both so-called terms of endearment that Torvald uses to address Nora; however, these nicknames are extremely revealing. 

One of the first things Nora does in the play is to ask Torvald for money, as much as he can spare her. While the audience later learns that Nora is scrimping every penny she can in order to pay off her debt, initially it seems as though she is ridiculously shallow. Torvald is of a similar impression and treats her as though she is a child begging for a new toy. His nicknames for her are as immature as he believes her to be. 

"It’s a sweet little spendthrift, but she uses up a deal of money. One would hardly believe how expensive such little persons are!" 

This is a line of Torvald's from early on in Act I and it is just one of many occasions where he playfully chides Nora for her supposed greediness. Shortly after, he accuses Nora of buying and eating sweets while she was shopping and continues to insult her intelligence with more ridiculous nicknames. He appears to heavily disapprove of her eating anything unhealthy without his permission, yet again proving that he thinks of her as a child rather than his wife.

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