"A beaten warrior. None of his comrades came to him, helped him, his brave and noble, followers; they ran for their lives, fled deep in a wood. And only one of them remained, stood there, miserable, remembering, as a good man must, what kinship should mean." What values are implied in these lines from Beowulf

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Several values are implied in this passage from Beowulf. The more obvious values are courage and loyalty, both of which are displayed by Wiglaf and conspicuously lacking in the other warriors.

Slightly less obvious, perhaps, are the values of strength and aristocracy. Beowulf has been the greatest warrior alive,...

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Several values are implied in this passage from Beowulf. The more obvious values are courage and loyalty, both of which are displayed by Wiglaf and conspicuously lacking in the other warriors.

Slightly less obvious, perhaps, are the values of strength and aristocracy. Beowulf has been the greatest warrior alive, but he is old now and no longer has the strength to defend his people. He dies honorably, from a mortal wound received in battle, but it would not have been honorable for him to linger on, since he no longer has the strength to defend his people.

The value of aristocracy is a vital feature of primary or "authentic" epic. The Beowulf poet, like Homer, describes men of aristocratic birth as brave and noble even when they are not behaving bravely or nobly (Paris, for instance, is also described as brave when he runs away from Menelaus). The degree of irony here is debatable, but even if the description is wholly ironic, it reminds the reader just what is expected from men of noble birth by showing how far short of this ideal the nobly-born warriors have fallen.

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Beowulf as a whole work of literature demonstrates the importance of many Anglo-Saxon values, but this passage specifically implies the specific values of perseverance, loyalty, and duty. The warrior culture of the Anglo-Saxons placed high values on these principles, as well as others such as truth and bravery.

In this passage, the "beaten warrior" is Beowulf himself, now an aging king, and he is engaged in battle with the dragon. Ten of the eleven thanes who accompanied him to fight the dragon have run away from the dragon's lair. Beowulf, though weakened and old, holds true to his warrior identity, supported by the one thane who does not flee with the others: Wiglaf. Wiglaf adheres to the heroic code by standing by the old king, showing his loyalty and duty as well as his perseverance. Together, Wiglaf and King Beowulf defeat the dragon, and though this battle with the dragon is the last for the elderly king, he has shown his heroism to the very end.

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The lines in question appear at the end of Beowulf. Beowulf, the epic hero, has just fought the dragon and lost his life to the beast. Wiglaf, the only warrior who comes to Beowulf's aid, stands by his king and fights the dragon. After the dragon has taken Beowulf in its teeth, Wiglaf stabs the dragon. At this point, the dragon has become weak enough to allow Beowulf to finish off the "worm." All other men in Beowulf's company have fled to the woods (fearing for their lives). 

The men, by fleeing, prove to lack the bravery and nobility necessary of a true hero and warrior. They have failed their king. Wiglaf, after being named the new king, speaks very openly of his hatred of the men. He tells them that they would rather die than live the life of a shamed warrior. 

The values the warriors fail to possess are those of bravery and nobility. By running, the men do not prove their worth as true warriors. They do not back up their king in battle, and they do not repay him for all he has done for them. Instead, they shame themselves by running in fear. A true warrior does not run from a challenge or doubt his ability. A true warrior knows that a loss will only come if God deems it necessary. A true warrior fears nothing. 

The implications are obvious. The men will be shamed for not upholding the values of loyalty and bravery. They did not come to the aid of their king and running from the dragon illustrated their lack of bravery. 

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