Based on what you've read, do you think that boys and girls around the world develop relatively similar gender roles? If so, explain culturally why that might be. If not, explain why that may not be the case.

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According to the Global Early Adolescent Study, which was conducted by Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, the World Health Organization, and other organizations, boys and girls in different cultures around the world are slotted into strict gender roles (see the link below). This study looked at children ages...

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According to the Global Early Adolescent Study, which was conducted by Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, the World Health Organization, and other organizations, boys and girls in different cultures around the world are slotted into strict gender roles (see the link below). This study looked at children ages 10-14 in 15 different urban areas around the world, including Cape Town, South Africa; Shanghai, China; Cuenca, Ecuador; and Baltimore, United States, among other places.

The researchers found that across the globe, girls and boys in early adolescence are encouraged to follow different roles. Girls are seen as worthy of protection and control, while boys are encouraged to be independent. It's striking that cultures across the world encourage boys and girls to begin to acquire different gender roles in early adolescence. While these cultures are different, they are all intent on shielding girls and on protecting their sexuality, while boys do not have these constraints. Girls are encouraged to stay home, while boys are allowed to go out and investigate the world. These roles set up the idea that girls are weak and need to be cloistered at home, while boys have the strength to be independent. These roles are already assigned to boys and girls by early adolescence and affect their later development in adolescence and adulthood.

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