Base your answers to the following questions on the episode “Reconsidering CanCon” of TVO’s The Agenda from March 20, 2015: https://www.tvo.org/video/reconsidering-cancon. What are cord-cutters? How will Canadian companies adjust to this groups? How have Canadian broadcasters kept up with the Internet and new media?

Cord-cutters are people who no longer pay for cable. When reflecting on how well Canadian broadcasters have kept up with the Internet, consider how prepared they were for the increase in people who use streaming sites like Netflix.

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This segment is about the new CRTC ruling that reduces the amount of Canadian content (CanCon) on television. Steve Paikin is interviewing policy analyst Kelly Lynn Ashton and television critic John Doyle to understand the problems with this ruling. About three-quarters of the way into the segment, Steve asks them...

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This segment is about the new CRTC ruling that reduces the amount of Canadian content (CanCon) on television. Steve Paikin is interviewing policy analyst Kelly Lynn Ashton and television critic John Doyle to understand the problems with this ruling. About three-quarters of the way into the segment, Steve asks them about the increasing number of people who no longer pay for cable. They call these people “cord-cutters,” because the traditional cable set required cords to set it up and now many people just stream television shows from websites like Netflix. Steve wants to know how prepared Kelly and John think Canadian production companies are for this new shift in watching content online.

When reflecting on how well Canadian broadcasters are keeping up with the Internet and new media, consider John and Kelly’s pessimistic responses to Steve’s question about cord-cutters. For instance, John says that the Canadian broadcasts companies did not keep up with changes in the television industry around the world. Meanwhile, Kelly says that it is producers who need to make more effort to catch up. These perspectives seem to suggest that Canada’s television industry is not quite ready for this age of internet content.

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